We Forget Today: Hunterdon County WW1 Exhibit at the Red Mill Museum Village, Clinton, NJ

We forget today just what an impact World War I had on the lives of its participants and their families.  This is the opening line for the Webmaster’s “We Forget Today” blogposts.  But the staff at the Red Mill Museum Village in Clinton, NJ have not forgotten.  In fact, for a small museum with a small exhibition space they’ve put together a wonderfully thorough exhibit outlining Hunterdon County’s role in WW1.  Readers in the area are encouraged to visit it.     What made this Continue reading →

We Forget Today: April 6, 1917–America Joins the Allies

The Webmaster has been awaiting this day for the last few years.  Funny, now that it has arrived he has no brilliant speeches / no words to say; except for the line he uses to being a “We Forget Today” blog post:  “We forget today just what an impact World War I had on the lives of its participants and their families.”  It took months to mobilize and train Pershing’s Army and to ship it overseas, but the impact was already being felt across the U.S. and Continue reading →

We Forget Today: Private John J. Monson of the Lost Battalion

  We forget today just what an impact World War I had on the lives of its participants and their families.  Last Fall author Kevin Fitzpatrick sent the webmaster two blog posts from his upcoming book:  “World War I New York:  A Guide to the City’s Enduring Ties to the Great War.”  However, the webmaster has been delinquent in publishing them.  With the book set to release in late March, 2017, here is one of the two stories:   When the City Rallied for John J. Continue reading →

We Forget Today: Doughboy Day at Fort Jay, Governors Island, NYC, September, 2016

Reenactor and NYC tour guide Kevin Fitzpatrick worked with the World War I Centennial Committee for New York and various reenacting groups and historians to organize Doughboy Day at Fort Jay, Governors Island on September 17, 2016.  New Yorkers were reminded of that long-ago war through a combination of displays and speaking programs.  The day ended with a march to Meuse-Argonne Point, where the Webmaster had the opportunity to say a few words about the war, the doughboys and the Meuse-Argonne.  His text is published below: Continue reading → Continue reading →

We Forget Today: Paris, July 4, 1917, “Lafayette We are Here.”

  We forget today just what an impact World War I had on the lives of its participants and their families.  That is certainly true for war-weary France; when the first Doughboys arrived in their country.  Ninety-nine years ago, on the 4th of July, 1917, one of the most memorable phrases of American involvement in the Great War was coined.  It came during a speech at the end of a five-mile march by the 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division, AEF.  Bowing to French pressure Continue reading →

We Forget Today: Three Ways to Keep Memorial Day from Three Nations

  We forget today just what an impact World War I had on the lives of its participants and their families.  This blog post will focus on three ways to keep the holiday from the point of view of three different nationalities; but first, a bit of history on Decoration Day (to be later named Memorial Day) is in order.   HEADQUARTERS GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC General Orders No.11, WASHINGTON, D.C., May 5, 1868 1. The 30th day of May, 1868, is designated for Continue reading →

We Forget Today: A Daughter’s Love for her Father, Jean Barnes-Butts and Russell Kingsley Barnes

  We forget today just what an impact World War I had on the lives of its participants and their families.   1917-18 and Post-War On August 1, 1917 Russell K. Barnes became a PFC in the 101st Field Artillery Regt., 26th Division, AEF.  On March 4, 1918 he was promoted to Corporal and on May 18, 2018 he became the Regimental Sgt. Major.  On Sept. 8, 1918 he was commissioned a Lt. and was re-assigned to the 1st Division, AEF.  Lt. Barnes would survive Continue reading →

We Forget Today: A Map of the Region Dated December 1920

We forget today just what an impact World War One had on the lives of its participants and their families.  When doing some research for the blogpost “Reader’s Question:  “Translating” Burial Locations…” from 5 May the webmaster came across the link below.  It shows French map Verdun 35 and it is dated December 1920, just a little more than 2 years after the Armistice.  One can see the villages / areas that are destroyed.  One can also see train lines–standard and narrow gauge, cemeteries and Continue reading →

News and Events–Over There: Rededication of the Lafayette Escadrille Memorial, Marnes-la-Coquette (near Paris), Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Background We forget today just what an impact World War One had on the lives of its participants and their families.  Even before the United States officially entered the war, hundreds of Americans flocked to Europe; mostly volunteering to fight on the Allied side.  Those volunteers who signed up with the French ended up in the French Foreign Legion, the American Field Service (Ambulance Corps) and the French Air Service.  Those who joined the Aéronautique Militaire were technically in the “Escadrille Lafayette,” a single squadron consisting of American pilots with Continue reading → Continue reading →

We Forget Today: Michigan in the World War

We forget today just what an impact World War One had on the lives of its participants and their families.  Over the last several years Michigan resident Dennis Skupinski has been creating YouTube videos that tell the story of some of Michigan’s activities during the war and the achievements of its war-time leaders after the war.  A link to one of his videos is provided below: Give the First World War a Second Look:  Michigan’s WW1 Centennial Enjoy!