We Forget Today: The Cost of the War–Lt. Col. Whittlesey, 77th Div., and John Nelson, 1st Div

We forget today just what an impact World War One had on the lives of its participants and their families.  During these Centennial years it is easy to get caught up in the excitement of commemorations and plans to visit the battlefields again.  (The Webmaster just marched in NYC’s Veteran’s Day Parade with a group of WW1 Reenactors.)  Yet every now and then–sometime between Veterans Day and Thanksgiving, perhaps–it’s a fitting time to reflect on the human cost of the war.  Consider the two well-documented cases below; and remember Continue reading → Continue reading →

We Forget Today: Sgt. York Sites, Pall Mall, TN

We forget today just what an impact World War One had on the lives of its participants and their families…   Pilgrimage definition:  A journey, especially a long one, made to some sacred place as an act of religious devotion.  (Dictionary.com.) A visit to the Sgt. York Sites in Pall Mall, TN had long been on the webmaster’s bucket list.  So, on a recent business trip to Nashville, he took an additional day off for the 2.5 hour drive from Nashville to Pall Mall, TN Continue reading → Continue reading →

We Forget Today: Argonne Farm, Bridgewater, NJ

We forget today just what an impact World War One had on the lives of its participants and their families.  In the early 1990s the webmaster drove past an aging barn with “Argonne Farm” painted on its side at the corner of Washington Valley Road and Argonne Farm Road in Bridgewater, NJ.  Twenty some years later, the webmaster finally pursued the WW1 connection and spoke with the original owner’s son.  Here is the story: Continue reading →

We Forget Today: Maryland War Memorial, Baltimore, Maryland

We forget today just what an impact World War One had on the lives of its participants and their families.  As in many cities and towns across the U.S., the Governor of Maryland and the Mayor of Baltimore appointed a joint building commission in 1919–only months after the war’s end–for a war memorial as “a tribute to those citizens of Maryland who gave their lives and services to their country in World War 1.” Continue reading →