News and Events–Stateside: April 6 is Fast Approaching. Stay Informed of Upcoming Events

  Did you know?  Do your Friends know? April 6–the 100th anniversary of U.S. entry into the war is fast approaching, and events will be happening across the U.S. to mark the date. The WW1CC  (http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php) is an umbrella organization that communicates among all groups and does so much more. The WW1CC provides a monthly (or bimonthly) “Education Resources” newsletter for educators.  (Drop-down tab “Educate.”) The WW1CC will post “Stories of Service” about your relative who fought in the Great War.  (Drop-down tab “Commemorate.”) The WW1CC is raising funds to build Continue reading →

Then and Now: Montfaucon under German Occupation

Authors/researchers and editors/publishers don’t always share the same objectives.  More often than not, photographs, maps, tables, etc. get edited out of books for reasons of length, readability, etc.  The webmaster felt this when reading William Travis Walker Jr.’s well-researched “Betray at Little Gibraltar:  A German Fortress, a Treacherous American General, and the Battle to End World War I.”  Mr. Walker’s description of the German positions in and around Montfaucon was largely verbal, with a limited number of photos and no war-time map. As one would Continue reading →

Travel Tips: Using a Smartphone Abroad

  Technology is certainly making the world smaller.  The webmaster remembers living in Germany in the mid 1980s and being largely dependent on “snail mail” to hear from home.  The internet and emails were still in their infancy; and he could not afford a computer at that time.  Today, one can travel much of the globe while staying connected via phone, skype, email and the internet–all through the smartphone.  However, the traveler has to wade through a full range of phone and calling plan options.  The two New York Times Continue reading →

Noteworthy Websites: Library of Congress Web Guide

The webmaster recently stumbled across the following web guide on the Library of Congress website:  A Guide to World War I Materials.  “This guide complies links to the World War I resources throughout the Library of Congress Web site.  In addition, this guide provides links to external Web sites focusing on World War I and a bibliography containing sections for both general and younger readers.”  Covered topics range from the John J. Pershing Papers to historic American newspapers, to geography and map finding aids.  Researchers and readers Continue reading →

Then and Now: Field Hospitals Between Cuisy and Septsarges

    Caption:  Fig. 73–View from Cuisy across the valley toward Septsarges, showing Field Hospitals No. 19 and No. 21.   Location:  The photo is taken from the home / farm complex on the Northeast side of Cuisy.  The road in the foreground–which is the best way to match up the pictures–is the D19a (Route de Montfaucon).  Note that there appears to be no farmhouse (or farmhouse remains) on the right side of the road in the then photo.  The road running along the hilltop is the Continue reading →

It’s a Wonderful (Web) Life: The Meuse-Argonne Version

Frank Capra’s movie “It’s a Wonderful Life” has become a holiday classic in the U.S.; and likely in other countries too.  (The German title is “Ist das Leben nicht schoen?” and the French title is “La vie est belle.”)  In the film, the main star, George Bailey, learns just how much impact one person’s life can have on other people.  In the words of Clarence the Angel:  “Strange, isn’t it?  Each man’s life touches so many other lives.  When he isn’t around he leaves an Continue reading →

News and Events–U.S.: A Melange of WW1 Media as April 2017 Approaches

  This post will focus on four media items:  A video on NJ in the Great War; the exhibit “World War I and American Art;” the upcoming American Experience (PBS) film “The Great War;” and the WW1 Centennial’s Website, which is full of information on upcoming events.     Video:  NJ in the Great War New Jersey’s WW1 Centennial Commission and the NJ Dept. of Travel and Tourism are promoting travel regarding New Jersey’s role in the Great War.  They have prepared a two-minute video that Continue reading →

Travel Tips: Passe au Present! Militaria Shop in Dun-sur-Meuse

  The webmaster enjoys “discovering” new places every time he visits the Meuse-Argonne; and this happened in November, when he discovered the Passé au Présent! militaria shop in Dun-sur-Meuse.   The shop is run by father, Jacques Mansy, and his son, Thibault Mansy; each with their own areas of specialization.  Jacques Mansy specializes in unit histories, old postcards and ephemera relating to WW1, WW2 and the French colonial wars.  Thibault specializes in military antiques, including helmets, U.S. WW1 items and knives and bayonets from around the world.  Continue reading →

Then and Now: Aid Station in Cunel

    Caption:  The then photo is captioned:  “Figure 82–Aid station, 358th Infantry, at Cunel, Meuse, October 27, 1918.”  The 358th was part of the 90th Division, which entered the line in mid-October and continued the push northward. Note also in the then photo the sign “Ortskommandantur” above the door.  On period military translation dictionary translates it as Town Major’s Office.   Location:  6 Rue de la Fontaine, which is the D123, the main street running through town.  It is very easy to locate.   Continue reading →

News and Events–Over There: Spaces Still Available on the WW1 Historical Association’s June 2017 Pilgrimage, but Deadline Approaching

  Hello readers!  Space is still available on the World War 1 Historical Association’s June 2017 Pilgrimage to the Western Front, but the deadline for reserving your seat is December 31, 2016!  So don’t put off your decision-making too long; and please share this post with your friends who might be interested in the tour!!  Details can be found at this website:  http://ww1ha.org/2017-ww1-battlefield-pilgrimage/.     Tour Guide’s Skill Set This tour is being led by webmaster Randal Gaulke.  Many readers know that Randal has been travelling to Continue reading →